Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Warren Mason Demonstrates the Features of the Harbor Contractor Body



Warren Mason with Harbor Truck Bodies gives us a demonstration of the versitile Harbor Contractor body. See more at http://harbortuckandvan.com

Sunday, April 26, 2020

WALTCO - Customer Testimonials - North American Trailer



“Value to us is having an excellent product, number one, great service number two, and the reliability of the product itself that we don't see them come back for any issues. WALTCO does all of that for us.”
- David Ward, President and Greg Giguere, Director of Sales & Operations, North American Trailer

Friday, April 24, 2020

CHEVROLET COMMERCIAL ANNOUNCES BIG NUMBERS AT NTEA WORK TRUCK SHOW

Express offers 24 percent more torque; Silverado Medium Duty offers 23 percent higher gross combined weight rating; GM commerical sales have grown 67 percent since 2013




INDIANAPOLIS — At The Work Truck Show, Chevrolet announced a new engine for the Express and Low Cab Forward trucks, as well as a host of improvements for the Silverado 4500 HD, 5500 HD and 6500 HD chassis cabs. These changes are expected to fuel further growth for General Motors’ commercial fleet business, which has seen a 67 percent increase in sales since 2013.

“Our commercial fleet sales growth is a result of excellent product and an even better team,” said Ed Peper, U.S. vice president, GM Fleet. “The changes for Express, Low Cab Forward and medium-duty trucks are great examples of the team’s commitment to helping customers with their fleet vehicle needs. With the product changes for 2020, we are on track for another year of strong commercial growth.”

Heavy-Duty Power for Express, Low Cab Forward

For 2021, Express configurations and Low Cab Forward will be available late this summer with a new 6.6L V-8 gas engine. Originally introduced in the all-new 2020 Silverado 2500 HD and 3500 HD, the direct-injected engine is SAE rated at 401 horsepower and 464 lb-ft of torque for the Express. That is 17 percent more horsepower and 24 percent more peak torque than the 6.0L it replaces. The 6.6L output on the Low Cab Forward is 350 horsepower and 425 lb-ft of torque, which is nearly 18 percent more horsepower and 14 percent more peak torque than its outgoing 6.0L.

Whether hauling equipment, supplies or people, the additional output and wider torque band will give drivers more on-demand power and confidence, especially with heavy payloads. Approximately 70 percent of current Express owners opted for the 6.0L V-8 option, and Chevrolet expects this new engine to garner the same or increased take rate.

Demand for Express remains high across passenger, cargo and cutaway configurations, with commercial fleet increasing 12 percent year over year in 2019. Low Cab Forward trucks also had an excellent 2019 with a 109 percent increase in commercial sales year over year, gaining an estimated two points of share in the segment.

Medium-Duty Silverados Offer Customers More

Debuting in 2018, the Silverado 4500 HD, 5500 HD and 6500 HD chassis cab trucks fill an important space in the Chevrolet Commercial portfolio. Continuing to listen to its customers, Chevrolet is bringing a host of updates to medium-duty chassis cabs to further increase performance and flexibility for upfitting:

Maximum gross combined weight rating is now up to 37,000 pounds1, offering a 23 percent increase in hauling capability.
A new mechanical locking rear axle improves traction by automatically locking when a rear tire slips – such as driving off-road or on slippery surfaces.
Longer axle-to-end-of-frame options for the two shortest wheelbases enable longer upfit bodies and increased upfit flexibility.
New extended mirror arms, which offer better visibility on wider and longer upfit configurations, are coming soon.
New left-hand power take-off capability offers upfitters easy access to the PTO port from either side of the truck.
Auxiliary switch bank available with six additional upfit switches2 conveniently located in headliner.
Investing in Future Growth

GM’s fleet business is poised for additional growth, as investments in our manufacturing facilities will increase pickup truck supply to meet demand.

Recent investments at our manufacturing facilities include:
  • A $150 million investment at Flint Assembly in Flint, Michigan to increase production capacity of heavy-duty trucks by 40,000 vehicles annually, beginning in 2020.
  • A $175 million investment in a facility which will be built in Brookville, Ohio to produce engine components needed to increase production of the 6.6L Duramax diesel V-8 engines later this year.
  • A $1.5 billion investment, including $1 billion toward the Wentzville, Missouri plant, to prepare for future mid-size pickup and van improvements.
For more information about Chevrolet’s Commercial portfolio, please visit www.chevrolet.com/commercial.

1 37,000 pound Maximum Gross Combined Weight Rating requires 4.88 rear-axle ratio, 15k or 15.5k rear-axle capacity and the Allison 1750 or 2750 transmission.

2 Equipment from independent suppliers is not covered by the GM New Vehicle Limited Warranty. GM is not responsible for the safety or quality of independent supplier alterations.

ABOUT CHEVROLET

Founded in 1911 in Detroit, Chevrolet is one of the world's largest car brands, doing business in more than 100 countries and selling more than 4.0 million cars and trucks a year. Chevrolet provides customers with fuel-efficient vehicles that feature engaging performance, design that makes the heart beat, passive and active safety features and easy-to-use technology, all at a value. More information on Chevrolet models can be found at www.chevrolet.com.



Wednesday, April 22, 2020

2020 F-Series: There Are Trucks | Super Duty® | Ford


The new Super Duty, now with up to 37,000 lbs. of available towing and 1,050 lb-ft of available torque.* *Max gooseneck towing on F-450 XL, 4x2. Shown with STX Appearance Package. Max towing varies based on cargo, vehicle configuration, accessories and number of passengers. Max torque when equipped with the 6.7L Power Stroke® V8 Turbo Diesel engine. Towing and torque are independent attributes and may not be achieved simultaneously. Learn more about the 2020 Ford Super Duty® here: http://ford.to/2Gem1EI


Monday, April 20, 2020

Tongue Weight Safety Demonstration


Proper trailer tongue weight improves the vehicle and trailer towing experience by improving performance. Not enough tongue weight or force on the hitch/tow ball causes an increase in trailer sway from side to side, making it difficult to control. Conversely, too much tongue weight or force on the hitch/tow ball could overload the rear tires of the towing vehicle, pushing the rear end of the vehicle around. This could also negatively affect the vehicle handling. Performance is impaired as you might not be able to go around corners and curves properly, and your vehicle may not stop quickly enough when you press the brake pedal. The Weigh Safe Drop Hitch effectively measures the tongue weight of your towing load, improving the vehicle tow load balance and performance.

Learn more at: https://www.weigh-safe.com/

Saturday, April 18, 2020

The VanAir PTO Driven Underdeck Systems Walk Around Video



Understand the unique and powerful components of Vanair's PTO Driven Underdeck Air Compressor/Generator Systems, their benefits and features.

Learn more at: https://vanair.com/

Thursday, April 16, 2020

Rightsizing Your Vehicle Fleet to Conserve Fuel



Fleet rightsizing is a management practice that can help vehicle fleet managers build and maintain sustainable, fuel-efficient fleets. Fleet inventories often grow over time to include vehicles that are highly specialized, rarely used, or unsuitable for current applications. By evaluating fleet size and composition, managers can optimize vehicle use, conserve fuel, reduce emissions, and save money on fuel and maintenance.

Evaluate Vehicle Needs and Use
Fleet managers should understand their fleet's daily vehicle use and needs. Most fleet managers already have a handle on their number and type of vehicles, average mileage, payloads, and fuel economy. Fleet rightsizing combines this information with a critical look at fleet operations to identify opportunities to reduce energy use. When rightsizing, fleet managers should evaluate how important each vehicle is to the fleet’s performance by asking themselves:

What tasks are accomplished by each vehicle? Or, what is the drive cycle?

What is the daily, weekly, or monthly mileage of each vehicle? Or, what is the duty cycle?

Are fleet vehicles the optimal vehicle type, class, and size for the job?

Are there any vehicles that are no longer cost effective to operate or are no longer fulfilling their purpose?

Are there any vehicles that are no longer being used or have experienced a lot of downtime?

What is the fuel consumption of each vehicle? Can any vehicles be replaced by lighter, more fuel-efficient vehicles?

What is the age of the vehicles? Can any vehicles be replaced by newer, more efficient and reliable vehicles?

Are there any alternatives to owning or leasing a vehicle, such as shuttle bus services, motor pool vehicles, sharing vehicles with other offices/agencies, vehicle stipends, public transportation, or short-term rentals when needed?

Considering the answers to the previous questions, what is the optimal composition of the fleet required to properly support the fleet’s needs?

In addition to reviewing telematics or fleet analysis data, fleet managers should consider soliciting input from drivers when conducting a rightsizing review, as they can be very knowledgeable about how vehicles are being used to support operations. Gathering this input also gives drivers a stake in the development of rightsizing recommendations. Fleet managers can solicit input through driver surveys or face-to-face meetings to establish consensus.

A fleet rightsizing strategy should evaluate the business case of each vehicle to determine whether reassigning, replacing, or eliminating the vehicle would reduce fuel and maintenance costs without compromising fleet activities. Fleet managers often need to define evaluation criteria and rank vehicles to complete this analysis. A fleet dominated by sport utility vehicles, for example, may find that mid-size sedans can suffice with a significant reduction in fuel costs.

Fleet managers may develop their own analysis or use existing evaluation tools. The Vehicle Allocation Methodology developed by the U.S. General Services Administration is an evaluation framework that federal agency fleets use to ensure fleets are cost-effective and contain the appropriate number and type of vehicles. Learn more about this methodology in the Comprehensive Federal Fleet Management Handbook (PDF).

Make Smart Vehicle Purchases

Fleet managers may decide to replace older vehicles with more fuel-efficient or alternative fuel vehicles. These purchasing strategies may help fleet managers make decisions that meet operational needs and conserve fuel:

Transition to Smaller, More Efficient Engines: Using smaller engines can help fleets meet operational needs without downgrading vehicle class. Some fleets choose to switch from 6-cylinder to 4-cylinder engines to help reduce fuel use and emissions. In many cases, the new, smaller engine can have nearly the same horsepower as a larger engine. Fleet managers can also improve fuel efficiency by selecting smaller engines with optional gearing for their application.

Choose Lighter Vehicles: When purchasing new vehicles, look for opportunities to reduce vehicle weight. Lightweight materials, such as aluminum frames, and smaller components can reduce rolling resistance and drag, thereby improving a vehicle’s fuel economy. For example, a 10% reduction in vehicle weight can improve fuel economy by 6% to 8%. Also, try to avoid unnecessarily large body configurations and heavy accessories. For more information, refer to the North American Council for Freight Efficiency's Confidence Report.

Use Alternative Fuels and Vehicles: Alternative fuel and fuel-efficient advanced vehicles can reduce a fleet's fuel use, making them economical options for many fleets. Cost savings from vehicle maintenance, operation, and fuel use and price often offset higher purchase prices.

Source: https://afdc.energy.gov/conserve/rightsizing.html

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

The Evolution of the Harbor Landscaper Pro Body




Our original Harbor Master Landscaper Body has evolved. Our customers are always looking for better ways and we are adapting our bodies to meet those needs. We now have three Harbor Landscaper Bodies in our lineup. First, we have the original Master Landscaper that comes with MDO Plywood Gates with dual side exterior laminate, Rear latch swing away rear steel frame gates that lock to side for dumping. 

To that great body, we have added the Harbor Pro Landscaper which adds a back of cab 24" storage box that is about cab high. The curbside of the box has three shelves and a pull-out deep steel drawer on Teflon® bushings. This compartment goes almost all the way to the other side so it will carry long tools, gardening equipment, etc. and keep it safe and out of sight. 





The other side has a 22" deep compartment for smaller items and/or parts. It is available with one or more underbed boxes to match for additional space. Since this 24" box is in place, a typical 84" CA truck that would take a 12' Landscaper, now would have a 10' Landscape Dump and the 24" storage box. Many customers still prefer the 12' and this just requires the cab chassis to have a 108" CA. The Pro Landscaper has the same MDO Plywood sides and rear gate as the Master Landscaper.


Learn more at: http://harbortruckandvan.com/product/master-landscaper/


Sunday, April 12, 2020

Venturo Crane Selector Web Tool Pairs Vehicles with Cranes


Venturo® has released a new finder on its website to keep job sites equipped with the proper service cranes. The brand-new Crane Selector utilizes gross vehicle weight, necessary boom length and maximum load capacity to pair vehicles with the most suitable Venturo product.
Venturo cranes are designed for an array of light, moderate and heavy-duty applications, and matching vehicles with the right equipment to meet job requirements improves efficiency and safety on the job site. The innovative Crane Selector is a simple, effective tool to provide operators with the proper crane package.
Each crane, and crane line, is designed for a set of specific uses. Selecting the appropriate crane is an integral step toward more efficient operations and a safer job site. No piece of equipment, even the ideal crane, is 100% foolproof, but an improper product will at best limit performance and at worst endanger workers. The Crane Selector takes some guesswork out of the equation.
This new offering from Venturo joins Venturo Logic Controls™ (VLC) as another recent innovation from the crane manufacturer. The VLC™ Crane Control Management System brings safety, control and reliability to the company’s fully-hydraulic service cranes. This system offers safe, comfortable and smart crane operations by utilizing features like overload protection, a pistol-grip controller and visible safety alerts.
From dependable equipment to state-of-the-art technology, Venturo is ahead of the curve when it comes to safe, effective crane solutions. Try the new Crane Selector tool at www.venturo.com/support/crane-selector. For more information on electric, hydraulic and additional crane options from Venturo, visit www.venturo.com or call 800-226-2238.

Friday, April 10, 2020

7 Tips for Sharing the Road with Semi-trucks

Vehicles and semi-trucks driving on an interstate

Driving near large trucks

Did you know 75 percent of commercial vehicle accidents are caused by drivers in passenger cars? While actions like distracted driving certainly play a role in some of these cases, there are likely multiple occasions that happen simply because drivers don’t understand how to safely maneuver around large vehicles.
Though sharing the road with semis is a daily task, not all motorists understand the limitations of a semi — mainly wide turning radiuses, slow stopping times and large blind spots. To help educate the general public on safe driving techniques, the American Trucking Associations (ATA) started a highway safety program called Share the Road. Using some of the ATA tips and our own, we’ve compiled a list of driving habits that will help make the road a safer place.

Seven tips for motorists sharing roads with semis

Roadway safety is the responsibility of all drivers, but you can take certain steps to ensure you’re doing your part. When driving near or around a semi-truck, be sure to:
  1. Drive defensively
    Operating a vehicle probably comes second nature to you. But, no matter how comfortable or skilled you are behind the wheel, it’s important to remain alert at all times — especially around large trucks. Semis are bigger in size and weight, making them slower to react to avoid collisions. Pay attention to vehicle locations, traffic flow, vehicle signals and weather so you can anticipate problems and have plenty of time to safely change course if necessary.
     
  2. Keep a safe distance
    Driving close to a semi puts you at greater risk for being hurt by sudden stops, tire blowouts or roll overs caused by strong wind. So, whether you’re behind, in front or beside a large truck, leave plenty of space for merging, swerving and maneuvering. It’s best practice to keep at least a four-second following distance between you and the trailer in case of a sudden stop.
  1. Avoid blind spots
    The right side of a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) is the largest blind spot for a truck driver — sometimes blocking their view for three or more lanes. Other areas of concern include directly in front of the cab, behind the trailer and certain zones along the driver’s side. Avoid spending time in these zones to ensure the driver can see you.
     
  2. Pass quickly
    Passenger vehicles typically travel faster than semis, so it’s not unusual to pass a lot of trucks along your route. Practice safe passing by driving closer to the shoulder rather than the truck, and speeding up instead of lingering.
     
  3. Don’t cut a large truck off
    Semis have much longer stopping distances — up to two football fields when traveling 65 mph. To prevent a rear-end collision, make sure you can see the entire front end of the truck before merging in front of it.
     
  4. Dim the bright lights
    When traveling near or past a semi, make sure your bright headlights are dimmed. Bright lights reflecting off large truck mirrors can cause two seconds or more of temporary blindness when traveling at 55 mph. The general rule of thumb is to lower your bright lights when you’re one block (or closer) behind a semi.
     
  5. Always signal
    As mentioned, trucks require more time to react to motorists stopping, turning or merging lanes. Because of this, it’s important to signal the driver at least three seconds or more before upcoming changes. This timing allows the truck driver to slow down or move over.

Wednesday, April 8, 2020

Venco Venturo Industries | VLC™ Crane Control Management System | NTEA 2020


Making Cranes Smarter
The VLC™ Crane Control Management System brings safety, control and reliability to Venturo fully-hydraulic service cranes. This system offers safe, comfortable and smart crane operations by utilizing features like overload protection, a pistol-grip controller and visible safety alerts.

Saturday, April 4, 2020

Easy loading and unloading with the Harbor Flatbed with Removable Wood Gates




This Chevy Dually sports a Harbor Flatbed with full- width Headboard and Low Style Contractor Style Wooden Gates. The removable gates allow for easy loading and unloading. This body is often used by contractors and landscapers and allows carrying necessary equipment and materials.

To find out more, you may call Harbor Truck Bodies at 800-433-9452.
Also find us at http://htbi.net/

Thursday, April 2, 2020

The Maxon Story


Maxon Lift Corp. was founded in 1957. That same year, owner Max Lugash invented the Tuk-A-Way® liftgate, which remains the largest selling style of liftgate in North America. For more than fifty years, Maxon Lift Corp. has initiated and developed a variety of innovative products that have become truck equipment industry benchmarks. More company information can be obtained from Maxon and local Maxon sales representatives at 800-227-4116 or www.maxonlift.com